Book Review: The Witch Haven

When I first read the synopsis for this book back when it was announced, I was immediately intrigued. I love the idea of mixing WWI-era society with magic, especially from the viewpoint of women. I never realized just how much I needed a book like this in my life. 

Huge thanks to Simon & Schuster for gifting me an Advanced Reader Copy for my honest review.


The Last Magician meets The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy in this thrilling and atmospheric historical fantasy following a young woman who discovers she has magical powers and is thrust into a battle between witches and wizards.

In 1911 New York City, seventeen-year-old Frances Hallowell spends her days as a seamstress, mourning the mysterious death of her brother months prior. Everything changes when she’s attacked and a man ends up dead at her feet—her scissors in his neck, and she can’t explain how they got there.

Before she can be condemned as a murderess, two cape-wearing nurses arrive to inform her she is deathly ill and ordered to report to Haxahaven Sanitarium. But Frances finds Haxahaven isn’t a sanitarium at all: it’s a school for witches. Within Haxahaven’s glittering walls, Frances finds the sisterhood she craves, but the headmistress warns Frances that magic is dangerous. Frances has no interest in the small, safe magic of her school, and is instead enchanted by Finn, a boy with magic himself who appears in her dreams and tells her he can teach her all she’s been craving to learn, lessons that may bring her closer to discovering what truly happened to her brother.

Frances’s newfound power attracts the attention of the leader of an ancient order who yearns for magical control of Manhattan. And who will stop at nothing to have Frances by his side. Frances must ultimately choose what matters more, justice for her murdered brother and her growing feelings for Finn, or the safety of her city and fellow witches. What price would she pay for power, and what if the truth is more terrible than she ever imagined?

I was pleasantly surprised by how well-written this book was for being a debut novel. It was littered all throughout by some amazing quotes that left me really thinking.. And we all know how much I love my quotes! I also enjoyed how the author wasn’t afraid to tackle some of the known issues of the Edwardian Era, such as the atrocities done to the Indigenous population and women’s suffrage. I applaud her for handling those topics with the care that she did.

Frances was an interesting main character. I enjoyed the bond and love she had with her brother, as sibling relationships are usually non-existent in YA. She was also much tougher than I was expecting, willing to do whatever it took to get the job done. However, she did make some decisions that I didn’t quite agree with or understand her reasoning for. Though I suppose you could chalk that up to her age (and  I hate using that excuse). However, I felt that the side characters really shined in this book. I loved the mysteriousness of Finn. It kept me on my toes and always second-guessing my opinions on him. Lena was also great and I loved that the author included her story. But I have to say my favorite was Maxine. She was strong and icy, but so passionate about wanting more for her life. I loved that the author only gave you enough information about her to leave you craving to know more. I hope we finally learn her backstory in the sequel.

Women are supposed to be competent at everything, but experts at nothing. Haven't you heard

I would say that my only real issue with this story lies with the pacing. It starts off diving headfirst into the plot and immediately grabbing your attention but then the majority of the book meanders about. I thought the murder mystery was brilliantly thrown in to set the tone and give context for Frances’ connection to the magical world. However, I wish it would have played a more prominent role within the plot. It only seemed to show up at random times to move the story forward and didn’t quite feel as organic as I would have liked. Though the ending was very exciting, and while I guessed the “plot twist” early on, I still enjoyed seeing it play out.

Overall, this was an enjoyable debut novel and I’m really interested to see where the rest of the series takes us. I think that now Frances is fully integrated into the magical world, some very exciting things will start to happen and I cannot wait to see what they are!

Final Verdict: 4/5 Stars

 


Have you read The Witch Haven yet? If so, what are your thoughts on the story?  Is this book on your TBR? Do you enjoy reading stories about witches?

WWW Wednesday – May 27th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • Vow of Thieves (Dance of Thieves, #2) by Mary E. Pearson – physical book
  • The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune – audiobook

I am zipping through Vow of Thieves and am LOVING it. This sequel is nonstop action and intrigue so far. Pearson is killing it with this one and I am super excited to see how it all ends. I also kind of like how the two main characters have been split up in this book. It’s brought a new look to the story, one that was really needed I think.

I haven’t fully started listening to House in the Cerulean Sea yet but will get to it later today. I’ve only heard amazing things about it so I’m ready!

What did you recently finish reading?

  • The King of Crows (The Diviners, #4) by Libba Bray – physical book
  • The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) by S.A. Chakraborty – audiobook, reread
  • Aurora Burning (Aurora Cycle, #2) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff – physical book

I enjoyed all of these books for the most part, though I do feel a little letdown with The King of Crows. It was a finale that didn’t quite live up to the rest of the series which is always a bummer. I felt like the buildup took a really long time and then the climax was over very quickly, and lacked some of creepiness of the previous books.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • A Heart So Fierce and Broken (Cursebreakers, #2) by Brigid Kemmerer – physical book
  • Jade War (The Green Bone Saga, #2) by Fonda Lee – physical book
  • Ruthless Gods (Something Dark and Holy, #2) by Emily A. Duncan

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

WWW Wednesday – May 20th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) by S.A. Chakraborty – audiobook, reread
  • Aurora Burning (Aurora Cycle, #2) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff – physical book

My reread of City of Brass is going well. I’m not super keen on the narrator so I definitely prefer the physical book to the audio, though I do appreciate learning how to correctly pronounce all of the character names!

I’m enjoying Aurora Burning so far. It’s a little slower than I was hoping for and seems to lack some of the snappy personality that the first book had. But I’m only halfway through it so far so maybe things will start to really get going soon.

What did you recently finish reading?

  • The Oracle Year by Charles Soule – physical book
  • Now Entering Addamsville by Francesca Zappia – audiobook

The Oracle Year was a really fun read. I enjoyed all of the different perspectives, as they made it seem much more realistic in how a situation like this would go down. The ending was super crazy and not at all what I was expecting but it was still a fun ride.

I have to say that I did not really enjoy Now Entering Addamsville. It ended up being a lot stranger than what I was expecting and the story didn’t always make a whole lot of sense. I get what Zappia was trying to go for, but the execution was definitely lacking. And the ending just wasn’t any good at all. I’ve heard her other novels are better so I may give one of them a shot at some point.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • The King of Crows (The Diviners, #4) by Libba Bray – physical book
  • Vow of Thieves (Dance of Thieves, #2) by Mary E. Pearson – physical book
  • A Heart So Fierce and Broken (Cursebreakers, #2) by Brigid Kemmerer – physical book

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

WWW Wednesday – May 13th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • The Oracle Year by Charles Soule – physical book
  • Now Entering Addamsville by Francesca Zappia – audiobook

I’m currently in the middle of both of these books and enjoying them. I will say that I had no idea that Now Entering Addamsville was a paranormal mystery but I am so into it. I feel like maybe I should read more of those now. Also, The Oracle Year is really interesting. I’m loving seeing how all different sides are viewing these predictions and the man behind them. It seems very real on what it would be like if it truly happened in real life.

What did you recently finish reading?

  • Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by Kate Racculia – audiobook
  • The Devil’s Thief (The Last Magician, #2) by Lisa Maxwell – physical book
  • Artemis by Andy Weir – physical book

I absolutely loved The Devil’s Thief, enjoyed Tuesday Mooney, and truly disliked Artemis. I enjoyed the plot, but felt the characters were very flat and Weir’s writing style is truly pedantic. That man has very high opinions of his scientific knowledge and loves showing it off… It makes me want to hurl.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) by S.A. Chakraborty – audiobook, reread
  • Aurora Burning (Aurora Cycle, #2) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff – physical book
  • The Philosopher’s Flight (The Philosophers Series, #1) by Tom Miller – physical book

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

WWW Wednesday – May 6th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by Kate Racculia – audiobook
  • The Devil’s Thief (The Last Magician, #2) by Lisa Maxwell – physical book
  • Artemis by Andy Weir – physical book

I’m a little over halfway through Artemis. And while I’m enjoying it, I hate the extensive science lessons that Weir thinks we need to have every other paragraph. There’s a reason I didn’t read The Martian, dude. Please save your need to sound really intelligent for someone else.

I’m also a 1/4 of the way through The Devil’s Thief and loving it so far. I like how the different POVs are giving us insight into what’s happening from completely different perspectives. There’s a lot going on but I’m enjoying every second of it.

I hope to finish Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by tomorrow. It’s a fun story and has turned into something a little different than what I was expecting. I think this is actually about grief and that was something I had no idea was even going to be a topic when I first picked it up. I like that but I much prefer the game and mystery aspect more… Sorry!

What did you recently finish reading?

  • Descendant of the Crane by Joan He – physical book
  • Things in Jars by Jess Kidd – audiobook

Things in Jars was such a good book. It was entertaining and interesting and I never knew what was going to happen next. I highly recommend the audiobook version for it as well. The narrator did such an awesome job with all of the voices and accents. You won’t regret it!

Descendant of the Crane was a little bit of a letdown. It was an interesting story and I loved the actual plot, but I think the world-building could have used a bit more exploration. It didn’t feel complete to me and there wasn’t enough information given to understand it. The ending left a strong possibility for a sequel and so I’m hoping that those issues could be remedied with the second book.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • The Last Equation of Isaac Severy by Nova Jacobs – physical book
  • The Oracle Year by Charles Soule – physical book
  • The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) by S.A. Chakraborty – audiobook, reread

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

WWW Wednesday – April 29th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • Descendant of the Crane by Joan He – physical book
  • Things in Jars by Jess Kidd – audiobook

I actually should finish both of these books up today. I’m enjoying both, though I think I prefer Things in Jars overall. I’m still making my mind up on how I feel about Descendant of the Crane. There are just some things about the world-building that don’t quite make sense to me and I find myself getting a little confused at times. Hopefully things will all make sense in the end! But Things in Jars is truly delightful – a little creepy, unique, and full of interesting characters.

What did you recently finish reading?

  • The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee – audiobook
  • Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves, #1) by Mary E. Pearson – physical book
  • House of Earth and Blood (Crescent City, #1) by Sarah J. Maas – physical book

Words cannot describe how much I loved all three of these books. Crescent City ended up being everything I had hoped it would and more. Maas knocked it out of the park with her first adult fantasy. Dance of Thieves was sooo good. I literally cannot wait to pick up the sequel to find out what will happen next! And The Downstairs Girl was very unique for a historical fiction. It showed us a time that’s hardly shown in novels, as well as painting it from a different perspective. I definitely recommend it!

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • Tuesday Mooney Talks to Ghosts by Kate Racculia – audiobook
  • The Devil’s Thief (The Last Magician, #2) by Lisa Maxwell – physical book
  • Artemis by Andy Weir – physical book

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

WWW Wednesday – February 19th, 2020

Welcome to WWW Wednesday which is currently being hosted by Sam @ Taking On A World of Words. It’s really just a place to do little update on what all you’ve been reading lately. Anyone is welcome to join, just leave a link to your post in the comments and be sure to give the appropriate credit to Sam!

The Three W’s are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

Currently Reading

  • The Vine Witch (Vine Witch, #1) by Luanne G. Smith – audiobook
  • The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough – physical book
  • Reign of the Fallen (Reign of the Fallen, #1) by Sarah Glenn Marsh – physical book

I haven’t read much of The Thorn Birds this past week but I plan to dive back into it today. I think it’ll be good to help break up the fantasy aspects of The Vine Witch and Reign of the Fallen. I just started listening to The Vine Witch and haven’t gotten too far into the story yet but it’s been very interesting so far. I like the idea that witches are the reason for that France has such great wine. I only started on Reign of the Fallen last night so it is still very early going with that read as well. However, I love that you’re immediately thrown into the action. The first couple of chapters have really piqued my interest and I can’t wait to get further into the story and this world of necromancy

What did you recently finish reading?

  • Kingsbane (Empirium, #2) by Claire Legrand – physical book
  • The Guinevere Deception (Camelot Rising, #1) by Kiersten White – audiobook

I should have a full review of Kingsbane up by the end of the week so I won’t go into too much detail on that one. But I will say that I enjoyed it and that ending left me reeling. There were a few issues with the book overall that I had but I’ll dive more into those in my review.

As for The Guinevere Deception… Man, I have to say this was my first disappointing read (or listen to if you want to nitpick). It started off slow, then got a little interesting, and then finally got so boring that I just stopped caring. I’ll admit that I zoned out during the last two hours of listening and can’t remember how it ended. Suffice it to say that it was not the book for me, even though I reallyyyyyyy wanted it to be.

What do you think you’ll read next?

  • Radiance by Catherynne M. Valente – physical book
  • Before the Devil Breaks You (The Diviners, #3) by Libba Bray – physical book
  • What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon – audiobook

What are you currently reading? What books did you finish this week? What are you planning on reading next? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Leave a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments below!

Wonderfilled Reads Favorites: Underrated Books

Today I just wanted to take a little time to highlight some of my favorite books that aren’t super popular in the bookish community. I feel like we all tend to focus, myself included, on the really popular books and forget to spread the word about the lesser known titles that we love as well. Am I the only one who feels this way? Possibly. Which is why I decided to share some of own little “underrated” favorites with all of you… Sharing is caring after all! 😉


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Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal

Yes, this book was picked for Reese Witherspoon’s Book Club but I still never see anyone talking about it! You all know that I’m not much of a contemporary reader, but I listened to the audiobook of this one and immediately fell in love. It was funny, heartwarming, and really engaging. I also loved getting to learn a little more about the Indian community in London. I cannot recommend this book enough.

Nikki lives in cosmopolitan West London, where she tends bar at the local pub. The daughter of Indian immigrants, she’s spent most of her twenty-odd years distancing herself from the traditional Sikh community of her childhood, preferring a more independent (that is, Western) life. When her father’s death leaves the family financially strapped, Nikki, a law school dropout, impulsively takes a job teaching a “creative writing” course at the community center in the beating heart of London’s close-knit Punjabi community.

Because of a miscommunication, the proper Sikh widows who show up are expecting to learn basic English literacy, not the art of short-story writing. When one of the widows finds a book of sexy stories in English and shares it with the class, Nikki realizes that beneath their white dupattas, her students have a wealth of fantasies and memories. Eager to liberate these modest women, she teaches them how to express their untold stories, unleashing creativity of the most unexpected—and exciting—kind.

As more women are drawn to the class, Nikki warns her students to keep their work secret from the Brotherhood, a group of highly conservative young men who have appointed themselves the community’s “moral police.” But when the widows’ gossip offers shocking insights into the death of a young wife—a modern woman like Nikki—and some of the class erotica is shared among friends, it sparks a scandal that threatens them all.

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Sanctuary by V.V. James

I had no idea what to expect when I first picked up this book, but oh man, it was a wild ride! This book little bit of everything – diverse characters, a murder mystery, deals with grief and hysteria. I mean, it REALLY has it all. Just note, that this is an adult book and does get dark in places.

The small Connecticut town of Sanctuary is rocked by the death of its star quarterback.

Daniel’s death looked like an accident, but everyone knows his ex-girlfriend Harper is the daughter of a witch – and she was there when he died.

Then the rumours start. When Harper insists Dan was guilty of a terrible act, the town turns on her. So was his death an accident, revenge – or something even darker?

As accusations fly and secrets are revealed, paranoia grips the town, culminating in a trial that the whole world is watching . . .

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Honor Among Thieves (The Honors, #1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre

This series has really blown me away so far. The concept of a person basically connecting to an alien (that is also a living ship) is such an interesting and unique idea. I think the sequel kicked the action up even more than the first book.

Petty criminal Zara Cole has a painful past that’s made her stronger than most, which is why she chose life in New Detroit instead of moving with her family to Mars. In her eyes, living inside a dome isn’t much better than a prison cell.

Still, when Zara commits a crime that has her running scared, jail might be exactly where she’s headed. Instead Zara is recruited into the Honors, an elite team of humans selected by the Leviathan—a race of sentient alien ships—to explore the outer reaches of the universe as their passengers.

Zara seizes the chance to flee Earth’s dangers, but when she meets Nadim, the alien ship she’s assigned, Zara starts to feel at home for the first time. But nothing could have prepared her for the dark, ominous truths that lurk behind the alluring glitter of starlight.

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A Million Junes by Emily Henry

Honestly, Emily Henry is the only author that writes magical realism that I love. Her stories are always so poignant and full of emotion. And man, this book… it will wreck you in the best ways possible.

For as long as Jack “June” O’Donnell has been alive, her parents have had only one rule: stay away from the Angert family. But when June collides—quite literally—with Saul Angert, sparks fly, and everything June has known is thrown into chaos.

Who exactly is this gruff, sarcastic, but seemingly harmless boy who has returned to their hometown of Five Fingers, Michigan, after three mysterious years away? And why has June—an O’Donnell to her core—never questioned her late father’s deep hatred of the Angert family? After all, the O’Donnells and the Angerts may have mythic legacies, but for all the tall tales they weave, both founding families are tight-lipped about what caused the century-old rift between them.

As Saul and June’s connection grows deeper, they find that the magic, ghosts, and coywolves of Five Fingers seem to be conspiring to reveal the truth about the harrowing curse that has plagued their bloodlines for generations. Now June must question everything she knows about her family and the father she adored, and she must decide whether it’s finally time for her—and all the O’Donnells before her—to let go.

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Ink and Bone (The Great Library, #1) by Rachel Caine

I just want everyone to read this amazing series set in an alternate history where the Great Library of Alexandria never burned down, but instead now controls the world and all writing. Do you love books? Action? A quirky cast of characters? If you said yes to any of those, then you’ll love this fun series.

Ruthless and supremely powerful, the Great Library is now a presence in every major city, governing the flow of knowledge to the masses. Alchemy allows the Library to deliver the content of the greatest works of history instantly—but the personal ownership of books is expressly forbidden.

Jess Brightwell believes in the value of the Library, but the majority of his knowledge comes from illegal books obtained by his family, who are involved in the thriving black market. Jess has been sent to be his family’s spy, but his loyalties are tested in the final months of his training to enter the Library’s service.

When his friend inadvertently commits heresy by creating a device that could change the world, Jess discovers that those who control the Great Library believe that knowledge is more valuable than any human life—and soon both heretics and books will burn…

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The Dark Days Club (Lady Helen, #1) by Alison Goodman

I could go on and on about meticulously researched the author did on Regency England because she truly transports you into that era. You feel as if you could be reading a fantastical Jane Austen novel at times but with a little added spice. Stubborn heroine, check. Hate-to-love trope, check. Paranormal activity, check.

London, April 1812.

On the eve of eighteen-year-old Lady Helen Wrexhall’s presentation to the queen, one of her family’s housemaids disappears-and Helen is drawn into the shadows of Regency London. There, she meets Lord Carlston, one of the few who can stop the perpetrators: a cabal of demons infiltrating every level of society. Dare she ask for his help, when his reputation is almost as black as his lingering eyes? And will her intelligence and headstrong curiosity wind up leading them into a death trap?


What are some of your favorite novels that you think are underrated? Have you read any of the ones on my list? If so, what did you think about it?

Books I Meant to Read in 2019

Let’s be honest, there is always going to be books that you are really excited to read but just never get around to it. I have always had a really bad habit about buying so many books and then just never reading them but buying more instead. Though I’m pretty positive that’s just one attribute of being a bookworm, haha! And last year was no exception to this. There were quite a few books that I had totally planned to read but somehow never did. I don’t know how that happens, but it does… FOR SHAME.


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The Poppy War (The Poppy War, #1) by R.F. Kuang

When Rin aced the Keju—the Empire-wide test to find the most talented youth to learn at the Academies—it was a shock to everyone: to the test officials, who couldn’t believe a war orphan from Rooster Province could pass without cheating; to Rin’s guardians, who believed they’d finally be able to marry her off and further their criminal enterprise; and to Rin herself, who realized she was finally free of the servitude and despair that had made up her daily existence. That she got into Sinegard—the most elite military school in Nikan—was even more surprising.

But surprises aren’t always good.

Because being a dark-skinned peasant girl from the south is not an easy thing at Sinegard. Targeted from the outset by rival classmates for her color, poverty, and gender, Rin discovers she possesses a lethal, unearthly power—an aptitude for the nearly-mythical art of shamanism. Exploring the depths of her gift with the help of a seemingly insane teacher and psychoactive substances, Rin learns that gods long thought dead are very much alive—and that mastering control over those powers could mean more than just surviving school.

For while the Nikara Empire is at peace, the Federation of Mugen still lurks across a narrow sea. The militarily advanced Federation occupied Nikan for decades after the First Poppy War, and only barely lost the continent in the Second. And while most of the people are complacent to go about their lives, a few are aware that a Third Poppy War is just a spark away . . .

Rin’s shamanic powers may be the only way to save her people. But as she finds out more about the god that has chosen her, the vengeful Phoenix, she fears that winning the war may cost her humanity . . . and that it may already be too late.

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First We Were IV by Alexandra Sirowy

It started for pranks, fun, and forever memories.
A secret society – for the four of us.
The rules: Never lie. Never tell. Love each other.
We made the pledge and danced under the blood moon on the meteorite in the orchard. In the spot we found the dead girl five years earlier. And discovered the ancient drawings way before that.
Nothing could break the four of us apart – I thought.
But then, others wanted in. Our seaside town had secrets. History.
We wanted revenge.
We broke the rules. We lied. We told. We loved each other too much, not enough, and in ways we weren’t supposed to.
Our invention ratcheted out of control.
What started as a secret society, ended as justice. Revenge. Death. Rebellion.

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The Oracle Year by Charles Soule

Knowledge is power. So when an unassuming Manhattan bassist named Will Dando awakens from a dream one morning with 108 predictions about the future in his head, he rapidly finds himself the most powerful man in the world. Protecting his anonymity by calling himself the Oracle, he sets up a heavily guarded Web site with the help of his friend Hamza to selectively announce his revelations. In no time, global corporations are offering him millions for exclusive access, eager to profit from his prophecies.

He’s also making a lot of high-powered enemies, from the President of the United States and a nationally prominent televangelist to a warlord with a nuclear missile and an assassin grandmother. Legions of cyber spies are unleashed to hack the Site—as it’s come to be called—and the best manhunters money can buy are deployed not only to unmask the Oracle but to take him out of the game entirely. With only a handful of people he can trust—including a beautiful journalist—it’s all Will can do to simply survive, elude exposure, and protect those he loves long enough to use his knowledge to save the world.

Delivering fast-paced adventure on a global scale as well as sharp-witted satire on our concepts of power and faith, Marvel writer Charles Soule’s audacious debut novel takes readers on a rollicking ride where it’s impossible to predict what will happen next.

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Dance of Thieves (Dance of Thieves, #1) by Mary E. Pearson

A formidable outlaw family that claims to be the first among nations.

A son destined to lead, thrust suddenly into power.

Three fierce young women of the Rahtan, the queen’s premier guard.

A legendary street thief leading a mission, determined to prove herself.

A dark secret that is a threat to the entire continent.

When outlaw leader meets reformed thief, a cat-and-mouse game of false moves ensues, bringing them intimately together in a battle that may cost them their lives―and their hearts.

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The Smoke Thieves (The Smoke Thieves, #1) by Sally Green

A shrewd princess whose father is plotting against her. A brave soldier turned traitor. A loyal servant on a quest to avenge his family. A streetwise demon smoke hunter in desperate need of money. A charming thief with no clue about his true identity. Their lives would never intersect, until a war between kingdoms bubbles up, and the dangerous truth about demon smoke intertwines all their fates. Welcome to The Smoke Thieves, a tangled web of political intrigue, shifting alliances, and forbidden love, in a world where sometimes no amount of magic can keep you safe.

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Five Dark Fates (Three Dark Crowns, #4) by Kendare Blake

After the battle with Katharine, the rebellion lies in tatters. Jules’s legion curse has been unbound, leaving her out of her mind and unfit to rule. Arsinoe must find a cure, even as the responsibility of stopping the ravaging mist rests heavy on her shoulders, and her shoulders alone. Mirabella has disappeared.

Queen Katharine’s rule over Fennbirn remains intact—for now. But her attack on the rebellion exacted a high price: her beloved Pietyr. Without him, who can she rely upon when Mirabella arrives, seemingly under a banner of truce? As oldest and youngest circle each other, and Katharine begins to yearn for the closeness that Mirabella and Arsinoe share, the dead queens hiss caution—Mirabella is not to be trusted.

In this conclusion to the Three Dark Crowns series, three dark sisters will rise to fight as the secrets of Fennbirn’s history are laid bare. Allegiances will shift. Bonds will be tested, and some broken forever.

The fate of the island lies in the hands of its queens.


Do you ever have plans to read specific books and then never do? Do you stick to your TBR religiously? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? What are some books you want to read this year? What are some books that you didn’t get to read last year but wanted to?

 

 

My 5 Star TBR Predictions: Round 3

Another year means it’s time for another round of predicting which books I plan to pick up in 2020 will become 5 star reads for me. There’s a lot of amazing books that I’m hoping to read this year, so trying to narrow it down to just a few was pretty hard. I would love for all of the books that I read to be worth 5 stars but that’s just not possible. But hey, maybe I’ll be right with these!

Previous Posts:


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Kingsbane (The Empirium Trilogy, #2) by Claire Legrand

Rielle Dardenne has been anointed Sun Queen, but her trials are far from over. The Gate keeping the angels at bay is falling. To repair it, Rielle must collect the seven hidden castings of the saints. Meanwhile, to help her prince and love Audric protect Celdaria, Rielle must spy on the angel Corien—but his promises of freedom and power may prove too tempting to resist.

Centuries later, Eliana Ferracora grapples with her new reality: She is the Sun Queen, humanity’s long-awaited savior. But fear of corruption—fear of becoming another Rielle—keeps Eliana’s power dangerous and unpredictable. Hunted by all, racing against time to save her dying friend Navi, Eliana must decide how to wear a crown she never wanted by embracing her mother’s power or rejecting it forever.

I immediately fell in love with the first book in this series and have been waiting for too long to finally pick up this sequel. I have a feeling that this book may wreck me in so many ways and I’m ready for it.

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The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough

The Thorn Birds is a robust, romantic saga of a singular family, the Clearys. It begins in the early part of this century, when Paddy Cleary moves his wife, Fiona, and their seven children to Drogheda, the vast Australian sheep station owned by his autocratic and childless older sister; and it ends more than half a century later, when the only survivor of the third generation, the brilliant actress Justine O’Neill, sets a course of life and love halfway around the world from her roots.

The central figures in this enthralling story are the indomitable Meggie, the only Cleary daughter, and the one man she truly loves, the stunningly handsome and ambitious priest Ralph de Bricassart. Ralph’s course moves him a long way indeed, from a remote Outback parish to the halls of the Vatican; and Meggie’s except for a brief and miserable marriage elsewhere, is fixed to the Drogheda that is part of her bones – but distance does not dim their feelings though it shapes their lives.

Wonderful characters people this book; strong and gentle, Paddy, hiding a private memory; dutiful Fiona, holding back love because it once betrayed her, violent, tormented Frank, and the other hardworking Cleary sons who give the boundless lands of Drogheda the energy and devotion most men save for women; Meggie; Ralph; and Meggie’s children, Justine and Dane. And the land itself; stark, relentless in its demands, brilliant in its flowering, prey to gigantic cycles of drought and flood, rich when nature is bountiful, surreal like no other place on earth.

I’m always a sucker for a romantic saga, especially when with a historical setting. I’ve heard amazing things about this book and its miniseries adaptation, so I cannot wait to dive into it myself. I have a feeling that I may need to keep a box of tissues nearby…

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The Silence of Bones by June Hur

1800, Joseon (Korea). Homesick and orphaned sixteen-year-old Seol is living out the ancient curse: “May you live in interesting times.” Indentured to the police bureau, she’s been tasked with assisting a well-respected young inspector with the investigation into the politically charged murder of a noblewoman.

As they delve deeper into the dead woman’s secrets, Seol forms an unlikely bond of friendship with the inspector. But her loyalty is tested when he becomes the prime suspect, and Seol may be the only one capable of discovering what truly happened on the night of the murder.

But in a land where silence and obedience are valued above all else, curiosity can be deadly.

This book sounds like everything that I love – unique setting, mystery, and friendship. It’s also already getting a lot of buzz for a debut which makes me even more excited. I’m also getting a little bit of spooky vibes from the synopsis and cover, which is always fun as well.

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House of Earth and Blood (Crescent City, #1) by Sarah J. Maas

Bryce Quinlan had the perfect life—working hard all day and partying all night—until a demon murdered her closest friends, leaving her bereft, wounded, and alone. When the accused is behind bars but the crimes start up again, Bryce finds herself at the heart of the investigation. She’ll do whatever it takes to avenge their deaths.

Hunt Athalar is a notorious Fallen angel, now enslaved to the Archangels he once attempted to overthrow. His brutal skills and incredible strength have been set to one purpose—to assassinate his boss’s enemies, no questions asked. But with a demon wreaking havoc in the city, he’s offered an irresistible deal: help Bryce find the murderer, and his freedom will be within reach.

As Bryce and Hunt dig deep into Crescent City’s underbelly, they discover a dark power that threatens everything and everyone they hold dear, and they find, in each other, a blazing passion—one that could set them both free, if they’d only let it.

Let’s be honest, Sarah J. Maas can’t really do any wrong in my eyes. I have been waiting on this book ever since it was first announced and it’s so close to finally arriving! I’m glad marketing has finally labeled this book correctly as New Adult, which should have been the case as well for A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

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What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon

Anne Gallagher grew up enchanted by her grandfather’s stories of Ireland. Heartbroken at his death, she travels to his childhood home to spread his ashes. There, overcome with memories of the man she adored and consumed by a history she never knew, she is pulled into another time.

The Ireland of 1921, teetering on the edge of war, is a dangerous place in which to awaken. But there Anne finds herself, hurt, disoriented, and under the care of Dr. Thomas Smith, guardian to a young boy who is oddly familiar. Mistaken for the boy’s long-missing mother, Anne adopts her identity, convinced the woman’s disappearance is connected to her own.

As tensions rise, Thomas joins the struggle for Ireland’s independence and Anne is drawn into the conflict beside him. Caught between history and her heart, she must decide whether she’s willing to let go of the life she knew for a love she never thought she’d find. But in the end, is the choice actually hers to make?

Once again, we’ve got another historical fiction on this list. But can you blame me with that synopsis? And y’all know how much I love Ireland anyways, so everything about this book sounds right up my alley. This one was a Goodreads Choice Nominee this year and if that doesn’t excite you, I don’t know what will!


What are some books on your TBR that you think will end up being 5 stars? Have you read any of the books on my list? If so, what did you think of them? Are you surprised to only see two fantasy novels on my list? 😉